Schindler’s List (1993): The Story of an Unconventional Hero

Schindler’s List is about the saddest movie ever assembled and arguably Steven Spielberg’s best achievement in directing. Spielberg plants you right into 1943 Poland during the Holocaust when the sky was saturated with the ashes of the innocent victims of the Nazi agenda and evil lurked in nearly every corner of this ailing configuration of hell.

Spielberg doesn’t just demonstrate justice towards the real-life individual Oskar Schindler, through some of the most cinematically systematic maneuvers that ultimately expose his character vividly but also, demonstrates justice towards his legendary tale. I’ve followed the story of Oskar Schindler for a while now and I find it to be the utmost inspiring based-on-true-story narrative. To witness someone as egotistical and greedy as he evidently was, transform into this compassionate savior—even if his intentions weren’t 100% virtuous—is touching. 

The two performances that held this film together like glue where obviously, Liam Neeson’s portrayal as Oskar Schindler himself and astonishingly, Ralph Fiennes’s rendering of the psychotic, troubled Nazi commander Amon Goeth.  How they both didn’t snatch an Oscar for their depictions is beyond my knowledge.

I get deliriously sorrowful whenever I watch this movie and that’s why I choose to infrequently see it. But when I do, it’s always a soul-stirring journey into adversity that’s grander than any other film medium out there. Schindler’s List from a historical frame of reference is quite possibly the most righteous nonfictional, filmic piece ever conceived. 

Verdict: A

“Schindler’s List” is now available to rent and buy on YouTube, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play, Vudu, and Netflix. 

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